How to tell if your running shoes need replacing

I’m playing a bit of catch-up at the moment. Day six of the ‘Problogger get your blogging motivation back’ challenge has been released, and I’m only just putting out day five. Day five’s challenge is to write a ‘how to’ post. I actually struggled coming up with an idea for this post. I did come up with an idea of a cost-saving recipe that I make regularly, but I made it the other day, and it is too soon to make it again which means no photos. I’m going to leave it for a future post.

So today’s post idea came to me during my Sunday-Runday long run. How to tell when your running shoes need to be retired. Old, worn out running shoes increase your risk of injury due decreased cushioning and stability. I bought new running shoes during the week, however, I didn’t want to use them for my weekly long run until I’ve got a few short runs on them.

New Shoes

So trusty old runners were pulled out for an 18km run, and I certainly felt their age.

Worn SHoes2

There are a number of factors that affect when a pair of runners need replacing and includes brand/model of runners, distance run, running surface, running style, body weight, and frequency of runs. That said, there are a number of signs that will tell you that your runners might need to be relegated to walking or gardening shoes.

Distance run: There’s a general thought that you should replace your runners when you’ve covered 400-600kms. Some people get 1000+kms, but the distance you will get out of your running shoes will be influenced by the factors mentioned above. Some running apps such as Strava allow you to track the distance you’ve run, and allows you to being aware of the other signs when you reach that distance. I’ve been tracking my kms with Strava, and these old faithfuls have clocked over 700kms.

Worn shoes: If the tread on the soles has worn away, it’s a pretty good indicator that you need new shoes and that you’re not going to be getting the cushioning you need during a run. Additionally, if your toes have a worn a hole in the toe box, get thee some new shoes! You can see in the photo below that the outer heels, mid-sole, and toe of my shoes has worn smooth. At the midsole, the tread has actually worn down to be level with the white cushiony bit.

Worn shoes

Sore feet and knees: If you’re noticing that you are experiencing more knee or foot pain than usual, it’s a sign that your shoes aren’t providing you with the stability and cushioning you need. I during my long run that my feet were hurting, when they don’t usually do so. After I’d finished my run, my knees ached for hours. I’ve had knee issues in the past, but this was a different kind of pain and felt more like I’d had no shock absorption during my run. Definitely a sign that running is over for my old shoes.

Flexibility: Running shoes should be fairly firm. You shouldn’t be able to easily twist them. If you noticed that your running shoes have become quite flexible, it’s time to invest in some new ones.

After Sunday’s run, my old runners have been retired. I’m still quite attached to them – I bought them just before I got serious about running. They’ve seen me through my first half-marathon, and through a large portion of my training for my second half-marathon. So they won’t be going in the bin just yet, they’ll become my walking and gardening shoes.  Just quietly, I suspect I’ll be holding onto them until it’s time to retire my new runners.

 

Advertisements

Author: Georgia

30-something wife, and mother of four. Student, coffee drinker, chronic hobbyist, eternal day dreamer.

3 thoughts on “How to tell if your running shoes need replacing”

  1. Hi Georgia, I agree, it’s sooooo hard to part with your favourite runners! I do replace them when needed and like you, keep the old ones for “walking” around in, rather than wearing out my current running pairs for casual wear.

    Like

    1. Running is such an emotional and mental journey, it’s hard not to get attached for our runners that covers such far distances with us on our journeys. No wonder we struggle to throw them out.

      Like

  2. Hi Georgia, fantastic article! Check out our page, Find Your Fit, for professional information regarding running shoes and fitting tips similar to what you’ve done here. For our next post, we’re looking to feature a ‘runner’s personal tips about what they look for in new runners’. If this topic interests you, please write back to us to help spread the message of the importance of footwear for running, we’d love to hear what you have to say!

    Regards,
    Boris

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s